Algae Biofuel Energy in Argentina, Australia and Singapore

Algae Biofuel Energy in Argentina, Australia and Singapore

An Argentine company has opened the country’s first factory to make biodiesel from algae, hoping to use pond scum as a replacement for soy in making biodiesel as part of a push for renewable energy. Argentina is the world’s top exporter of soy oil, but using the edible oil to make fuel is controversial because it cuts into food supplies. While “Technological Development of Algal Carbon Capture and Storage” is the subject of a talk by Tony St Clair, Agribusiness Manager for MBD Energy at the 3rd Algae World Congress in  Singapore, 19-20 October.

  

Luis Andres Henao reports from Argentina (31 August 2010):

 

An Argentine company has opened the country’s first factory to make biodiesel from algae, hoping to use pond scum as a replacement for soy in making biodiesel as part of a push for renewable energy

 

Argentina is the world’s top exporter of soy oil, but using the edible oil to make fuel is controversial because it cuts into food supplies.

Oil extracted from algae is also seen as an attractive alternative to soyoil and other vegetable oils because it does not use land that could be used for food crops and can absorb carbon dioxide from power plants or factories.

The oil-extraction process also produces a protein-rich paste, which is edible.

“We’re not competing with the food supply but generating food, at a low cost and helping the environment because algae grow fast and trap carbon dioxide,” said Jorge Kaloustian, president of Oilfox S.A., the company that owns the plant northeast of Buenos Aires.

The Oilfox plant’s feedstock is currently 90 percent soyoil and 10 percent algae oil, but the company hopes to eventually depend entirely on algae, which can grow in seawater and even contaminated water.

The algae, which is grown in tanks inside greenhouses, produces a green oil in the photosynthesis process. It grows fast and can duplicate its weight several times a day.

“Algae can get a much higher yield per acre than say soybeans,” said John Williams, spokesman for the Algal BioMASS Association, a trade organization that groups companies involved with developing algae biofuels. “It can produce more than 10 times more fuel per acre than soybeans.”

Some researchers say algae-based fuel would be too costly to produce commercially, but plants that use algae oil have sprouted everywhere, from Australia to China as companies bet on growing demand for renewable fuels.

Exxon Mobil Corp last year announced a $600 million investment over the next five years to develop biofuel from algae.

Kaloustian said the new Oilfox biodiesel plant is the first of its kind in Latin America, and that it is cost effective, partly because the electricity it uses is generated from biogas that comes from sewage waste and compost is fed to the algae to encourage growth.

Through a deal with a JP Morgan-owned company, the carbon dioxide emissions that are pumped into the algae greenhouses from a nearby power plant will eventually be sold as bonds in the carbon market, Kaloustian said.

Oilfox has also signed an agreement with YPF, the country’s biggest energy firm, to produce 50,000 tonnes of biodiesel per year. Under Argentine law, energy companies will have to blend diesel with 10 percent biodiesel by year’s end.

“There’s great enthusiasm for producing renewable energy in Argentina because we have the material needed to make the blend which is soyoil,” Kaloustian said. “We made a bet on using soyoil with a bit of algae, but one day, it will all be algae.”

Source: www.planetaazul.com.mx

Technological Development of Algal Carbon Capture and Storage is the subject of a talk by

Tony St Clair, Agribusiness Manager for MBD Energy at the 3rd Algae World Congress in 

Singapore, 19-20 October.

Tony was Chief Executive of Federated Farmers of New Zealand for eight years (1997-2005) with the organisation having approximately 19,000 farm members at the end of Tony’s tenure. He has been on multiple committees at CEO level within New Zealand, which have involved International trade, food safety, human capacity building, farm safety and various emergency response groups for both adverse events and biosecurity.
During his time in New Zealand he also represented the Agriculture Sector in W.T.O. forums (Seattle, Cancun) and International Federation of Agricultural Producers, Cairns Group Farm Leaders and CER Ministerials. He was Chair of the Australian New Zealand Business Council in 2004. Tony also attended the COP 15 in Copenhagen in late 2009.

Prior to his time in New Zealand he was Executive Director of the Victorian Farmers Federation (1990-97) and had extensive commodity trading and commercial background in the agricultural production and processing industry. This included terms as a livestock auctioneer, Commercial Manager for Uncle Ben’s of Australia (1978 -85) and D.R.Johnston /Conagra (1986-1990).

MBD technology recycles captured industrial flue-gas emissions into oils suitable for manufacture of high grade plastics, transport fuel and nutritious feed for livestock and monogastric consumption.

MBD bypass the inherent problems associated with ‘geosequestration’ by keeping captured CO2 above ground for immediate large-scale production of valuable input commodities fundamental to the global economic supply-chain. MBD’s environmentally friendly carbon-recycling process also produces large quantities of ‘A1 quality’ fresh water and masses of pure oxygen.

MBD Energy has reached agreements with three of Australia’s largest greenhouse gas emitters:

• Loy Yang A (Vic);
• Eraring Energy (NSW);
• Tarong Energy (Qld).

The agreements are for the planning and provision of a pilot MBD Energy Carbon Capture and Recycling (CCR) plant at each location.

Each of these major coal-fired power stations has selected MBD Energy’s algal carbon capture, storage and recycling solution for three compelling reasons:

• Captured CO2 is immediately recycled into oil-rich micro algae suitable for oil and meal;
• 100% of the algae is recycled; 35% as oil for plastics or fuel, 65% for low-methane stock-feed;
• MBD’s CCR is today’s premier green house gas reduction solution for use by power stations.

Supported by an extensive, expert team, MBD Energy is co-operatively enabling delivery of a number of large-scale Demonstration Projects to be operating before 2020, as identified by the ‘G8 mandate on climate change.’ MBD expects to play a significant role in the newly created Global Carbon Capture and Storage Institute.

The 3 major projects will enable MBD to implement solutions that will soon enable broad industrial-scale deployment of its CCR technology.

Source: www.mbdenergy.com

One Response to “Algae Biofuel Energy in Argentina, Australia and Singapore”

  1. Brilliant,MBD energy what a vision, what organization,should be on the asx for small investors to feel that not only do they benefit,but help the future environment of their grand children and others.
    my respects, Tedy

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