Biodegradable “plastic” bags made from the starch of the Cassava Plant

Indonesian masterbatch supplier PT Inter Aneka Lestari Kimia knows that plastic products have become an integral part of our lives and to meet the growing technology, suitable materials are required. It is for this reason that the company has entered into the bio-resin market, having innovated a biodegradable resin using cassava plant starch. They exhibited at the Eco Products International Fair in Singapore. Read More

 

Catering to the Needs of the Industry

9 March 2011:

Indonesian masterbatch supplier PT Inter Aneka Lestari Kimia knows that plastic products have become an integral part of our lives and to meet the growing technology, suitable materials are required. It is for this reason that the company has entered into the bio-resin market, having innovated a biodegradable resin.

Although we are a local company, we are supported by international networks. We have gained international acknowledgement and maintain it through continuous improvements of our products.

What is the latest product introduced and why is this unique?

Herman Moeliana, President of EnviPlast answers:

Our latest product is a fully biodegradable resin and the product is registered under the trade name ENVIPLAST. It is produced mainly from tapioca starch, a derivative of vegetable oil and other ingredients derived from natural abundant resources. It is classified as a fully biodegradable resin that leaves no hazardous residue and is highly cost effective compared to resins under the existing similar product classification, like PLA.

Question: Explain briefly the benefits of ENVIPLAST.

Herman: ENVIPLAST dissolves instantly in hot water, softens in cold water and leaves only a small amount of ash when burnt. Based on experiments we have conducted, when a plastic bag made of ENVIPLAST is buried in soil, it will almost disappear in 3-6 months, depending on soil conditions, like the water content, amount of organisms and microorganisms present in the soil.

We have also discovered that an ENVIPLAST plastic bag can be eaten by insects and other small animals, such as snails. We are confident that our new product will be a reasonable alternative for applications like shopping bags where mainly PE is used.

Though ENVIPLAST is not yet certified according to EN13432, preliminary pilot testing in our own laboratory shows that ENVIPLAST is fully biodegradable after 6 months and does not harm the environment. ENVIPLAST, being in the same product catagory as PLA, is more economical and cheaper than PLA.

ENVIPLAST an environmentally friendly plastic alternative

The conventional plastic (polyethylene / polypropylene) used for shopping bags is the single largest contributor of plastic waste, polluting the environment. It is made from refined petroleum, a diminishing and non renewable natural resource, which many experts predict will be exhausted by 2100. Moreover, it takes hundreds of years to degrade, some taking more than a thousand years, resulting in catastrophic environmental damages such as clogging waterways that causes flooding, polluting rivers, seas, and endangering (an entire chain of the eco system which relies on these environments for survival)the livelihood of the water biota that accidentally ate consume the plastic bag.

ENVIPLAST as an alternative plastic is made from renewable and sustainable natural resources. The raw materials are starch from cassava, corn, etc and derivatives of vegetable oils like palm oil.

ENVIPLAST is a bio-degradable polymer, which can decompose in nature with the help of microorganism and water. The result is carbon dioxide (CO2), water (H2O) and biomass. It is also compostable, increasing the soil’s water retention.

In addition to microorganism, ENVIPLAST can also be consumed by insects, snails, and other small land and water animals, without any harmful or toxic side effects. In contrast to conventional plastics, ENVIPLAST is very environmentally friendly.

Source: www.enviplast.co.id

5 Responses to “Biodegradable “plastic” bags made from the starch of the Cassava Plant”

  1. Beverley Smith Says:

    Would like to start cassava project in Jamaica.

    We would like more information on this type of proceedure and the costs involved.

    Beverley Smith

  2. Would like to start business with 100% nature oriented plastic bags and other related products. Wuold like to more information please.

  3. Julius Bruce Says:

    Very interested in setting up biodegradeable cassava projects in West Africa in view of large quantity of cassava available in the Sub-Region.
    Would be pleased to have more information.
    kind regards
    Julius

  4. Peter Fogelis Says:

    Where can I buy these bags?

  5. Go to the source quoted in the article. I always show a source and a link.

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